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Food for a Good Night’s Sleep

by / Friday, 01 November 2013 / Published in Sleeping and Sleep Disorders
Foods for good sleep

The lack of sleep or insomnia can have terrible effects on your body. There are some foods that you can eat to help you get a better night’s rest to recharge and have a better morning!

Bananas: Having a banana before going to bed can help people suffering from sleep apnea by keeping their throats open. An Australian study examined the “surface active phospholipids” of bananas. It sought to determine how long the surface tissue of the mouth might retain these oily compounds. The authors of the study suggest that a coating of phospholipids on the throat may help prevent the collapse of the airway during sleep. This could have value in the treatment of sleep apnea and snoring.

Additionally, Bananas, well-known for being rich in potassium, are also a good source of Vitamin B6, which is needed to make melatonin (a sleep-inducing hormone triggered by darkness), according to an article published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Tart Cherry Juice: A natural source of melatonin, researchers in the Journal of Sleep and Sleep Disorders indicate that consuming cherries before bed helped people sleep faster and easier. The fruit is a natural sleep aid.

Flax Seeds: These are ideal for increasing levels of sleep regulating serotonin in the body due to high levels of omega-3 fatty acids which are proven to help reduce anxiety, depression, and stress which are leading causes of insomnia.

Most fish: Especially salmon, halibut and tuna—boast vitamin B6, which is needed to make melatonin (a sleep-inducing hormone triggered by darkness), according to an article published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Jasmine Rice: When healthy sleepers ate carbohydrate-rich suppers of veggies and tomato sauce over rice, they fell asleep significantly faster at bedtime if the meal included high-glycemic-index (GI) jasmine rice rather than lower-GI long-grain rice, in a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. While the authors aren’t sure how it happened, they speculated that the greater amounts of insulin triggered by the high-GI meals increased the ratio of sleep-inducing tryptophan relative to other amino acids in the blood, allowing proportionately more to get into the brain.

Kale: Green leafy vegetables, such as including kale and collards, boast healthy doses of calcium. And research suggests that being calcium deficient may make it difficult to fall asleep.

Sources:
http://sleepeducation.blogspot.com/2009/04/sleep-apnea-banana-cure.html
http://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/
http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/9_foods_to_help_you_sleep

photo credit: Sharon Mollerus via photopin cc

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